IPB

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

 
Closed TopicStart new topic
> VirtualBox on Win XP,Vista,7 64 bits, MacOS, Linux and Solaris, Walkthrough to run Mordor in a Virtual Machine on newer computers!
aardless
post Jan 20 2011, 10:26 PM
Post #1


Goblin Shaman at work (used to be: on strike...)
**********

Group: Admin
Posts: 5,406
Joined: 27-September 04
From: Somewhere on level 3, staring at the light
Member No.: 18
referrer::yahoo:



Here is a complete*, possibly rambling, rolleyes.gif walkthrough with screenshots to show you how to install a virtual machine program called
VirtualBox.
I wanted to do the VirtualPC walkthrough but it was brought to my attention that VirtualBox is capable of managing
your videocard too, contrary to what VirtualPC does (and both applications are free, BTW), so you can play 3D games
too in your VM (=Virtual Machine), albeit slowly as virtual machines are heavy applications and tend to be a bit slower
than your native OS. Another huge advantage of VirtualBox compared to VirtualPC, is that it can be run on Windows,
Linux, MacIntosh and OpenSolaris hosts meaning you can play at work on all of these machines!!! Well, assuming they are foolish enough to let you have administrator privilege at work. wink.gif
Let me know if you find errors.

*= actually, the Guest Additions isn't covered yet. The screenshots are uploaded but unreadable. I'll fix that when I can.

What you need:
-an install disk for Windows, at most 32 bits, like Win 3.x, Win 95, Win ME, Win 2000, Win NT, Win XP
-VirtualBox, download the proper version for your computer from http://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Downloads

Outline of the installation process to run Mordor and other games/programs:
-Install VirtualBox
-Make a new Virtual Machine
-Install Windows on it
-Add the Guest Add-on. This is unnecessary for Mordor, but useful for "tunnelling" to and from your videocard, and thus using 3D apps.
I have put up as many screenshots as possible to help out people who have never done this, it's a long process
but it isn't hard to follow the instructions, I'm hoping it's clear and easy enough that kids can do it on their
own without supervision. wink.gif
Run the VirtualBox installer:

Click Next. On the Next screen I enabled Bridged Networking, I don't remember if it's disabled by default. blush2.gif
If it is, leave everything as it is, otherwise disable it, and click on Browse and select a proper install location for VirtualBox.

Select if you want to have shortcuts, as usual.

The next screen is (self-)explanatory. The "Back" button doesn't work on this one. laugh.gif

Then let it install:

The next screens are for Bridged Networking, in case you selected it earlier, this is useful I think for allowing web
browsing from the VM, however it makes a special connection in your Networks, and I don't like it but I foolishly selected
it on the second screenshot of this walkthrough. You can choose to "Always trust Sun Microsystems" on the left, if you
want (I didn't), then select Install. I'm not sure you need this one, however installation aborted when
I clicked on Cancel, IIRC.

Click on Install on the following screen too.

Click Install one more time on the next screen:

VirtualBox installation is complete! yahoo.gif But there's still lots to do...

This is the VirtualBox default window that comes up when you run it, or if you left the checkmark on the previous
step. You can click only on few things among which shines the blue wheel of "New", this will create a New Virtual
Machine, a lengthy step (well, with Windows installation it is lengthy), but it needs to be done only once.
A GREAT feature of virtual machines is that you can copy the VM file, install a virus on your VM then replace the
VM with the copy you made, meaning no longer lengthy installs ever again!



--------------------
If money doesn't grow on trees, why is it that banks have branches? - sig of a guy on a chinese forum

Most off-topic topics are off-topic - fart642000
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
aardless
post Jan 20 2011, 10:28 PM
Post #2


Goblin Shaman at work (used to be: on strike...)
**********

Group: Admin
Posts: 5,406
Joined: 27-September 04
From: Somewhere on level 3, staring at the light
Member No.: 18
referrer::yahoo:



So clicking on "New" yields:

On the next step, you have to choose a name for your VM, very important if you plan on making more than one, and
what version of Windows will be installed. Technically it could be any Operating System, but since we want to play
Mordor it has to be Windows, of course. Select the correct version of Windows (remember it needs to be a 32 bits
version of Windows, I picked XP), then click Next:

This screen is very important, you select the amount of virtual memory the VM will use. I usually go overboard
and choose 512 MB, as you can see. If you only plan on playing Mordor you can probably choose a lot less than
that, but it's probably better, for stability and looong play sessions to have more memory rather than less.
Modern games also need lots of RAM.

Next, you select the hard disk maximum size. The default is 10 GB which is way too much for Mordor alone, but
if you plan to install demos, trialware and other shareware, you may need that. Personally I go with 10 GB, but
there is an option later on to let you have small disks so you can select 10 GB even if for the time being you
don't think you need more than 3 GB for Mordoring. If you have never created another disk, there will be only
one option on this screenshot, so click "Next":

Then "Next" (There's no "Back" button contrary to what it claims, BTW):

Here you select if your hard disk is a fixed size storage of whatever value you selected a couple of steps back, or
if will expand as you fill it. This latter option is what I mentioned earlier, you can select Dynamically Expanding
Storage, along with a disk size of however much you feel like having, and it will keep expanding as you use more
and more space on the virtual disk. I really don't see much need for Fixed Size Storage, unless you want to keep
other persons using your computer from guessing what is going on in your VM file... wink.gif So I picked Dynamically Expanding

Here you finally get to pick the location, on your physical computer, of the virtual hard-disk (click on the folder
with green arrow pointing up and browse to wherever you wish to install it. Pick a location that can accomodate it
easily, of course ) and the size of said hard-disk.

The next step is just a summary:

OK, we're back to the VirtualBox main window! Click on Settings (you first have to select which VM you want to set up,
actually, but since we have just one it doesn't matter, I think). To keep things as simple as possible, I'll just cover
what I consider the bare minimum here, so select Display on the left hand-side, and slide the videocard memory allotted
to the VM. This can be adjusted later, and I don't think Mordor needs more than 2 MB (haven't tried, it actually, but that
was the memory low-end videocards had back then), but if you plan on playing 3D games or watching videos, put a bit more
than what is highlited in red. I picked 32 MB just to be on the safe side, a sensibe value depends on your hardware.

Then click on Shared Folders on the left menu. It is extremely useful, for me, to have a shared folder to move files from
the VM to the Physical machine (generally referred to as "Host", BTW), and vice-versa, and here is where you specify it.
Click on the small blue folder with a green + on it:



--------------------
If money doesn't grow on trees, why is it that banks have branches? - sig of a guy on a chinese forum

Most off-topic topics are off-topic - fart642000
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
aardless
post Jan 20 2011, 10:29 PM
Post #3


Goblin Shaman at work (used to be: on strike...)
**********

Group: Admin
Posts: 5,406
Joined: 27-September 04
From: Somewhere on level 3, staring at the light
Member No.: 18
referrer::yahoo:



Then select the shared folder (click on the downward pointing triangle on the "Folder Path" empty field and select
"Other..." to browse to the prospective shared folder. You can name the folder on the next field, and select if it is to be
read-only (best security, but I generally dispense with that, as I don't browse sites or programs known to carry viruses) and
to Auto-mount the folder. I selected the latter...
http://www.freeimagehosting.net/image.php?8c73e2a31e.png
...as you can see here:

Click OK and... that's that! We now have to install Windows (urgh!!!), which I won't be covering, sorry for dropping the
ball, but you can follow this walkthrough which covers Windows XP installation. It's also a fairly slow
process. To do that you have to start the VM by selecting it and clicking on start, but BEFORE you do that I'd like to cover mouse
management. Your mouse will be captured by the VM when you click inside it. It can be insanely annoying if you forget that there
is a key to unlock it, which is by default the Right Control key for Windows (i.e. the Ctrl key next to the arrow keys, it can be changed,
see below), AND that you can install add-ons to the VM later, covered later in this tutorial, that will allow the mouse to
roam free inside and outside of the VM. However, during Windows install the mouse pointer *will* be captured, so remember
your escape key: "Right Control". If it is more convenient for you, you can even change that key in File->Preferences and
selecting Input on the left menu and change the Host Key and click on OK to modify it. With all this being said, place your
install disk in your CD or DVD reader, select the VM we created previously, and finally click on Start. You can also mount
an Windows image file if you have one, but for doing that you first need to run the VM, then on its drop-down menu at the
top select Devices->CD/DVD Devices-> Choose a Virtual CD/DVD disk file, then browse to your iso, then restart (Machine->Reset
in the top menu) the machine for the iso to "take". You'll be prompted by informative screens the first time you run the VM,
as long as you don't tick the "don't tell me again" box, it's no loss to reboot the VM straight away. Plus you can read them by
clicking on the link after this one:

The first informative window is this one (Note: Ctrl Droite=Right Control in French wink.gif ):

Then you should get this one:

If you selected a Windows Image file, like I did, this is the screenshot of how it looks:

At this point Windows installs and you have to provide all of the input it requires. You can find a tutorial with
screenshots e.g. here.

I don't remember exactly how it happens at this point, but this should be after Windows installation:

At this point you have a working OS.
You can then install the Guest Additions (required for 3D videocard tunnelling, from what I heard), by going to
Devices->Install Guest Additions (Note: I now notice these screenshots are too small to see what's going on,
so I can't reconstruct what you have to do, it's weird I believe I used the same page and command to upload
these screenshots, but they're somehow very different dry.gif )
http://www.freeimagehosting.net/image.php?69ce2fe972.png

<Rest of screenshots snipped>


--------------------
If money doesn't grow on trees, why is it that banks have branches? - sig of a guy on a chinese forum

Most off-topic topics are off-topic - fart642000
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

Closed TopicStart new topic
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:

 



Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 21st August 2019 - 06:02 AM
Bridged By IpbWiki: Integration Of Invision Power Board and MediaWiki © GlobalSoft
Copyrights and Credits